16 thoughts on “February 11, 2017

  1. It is sort of like companies that say ‘we followed all laws’ to defend some negative behavior…..WHEN they wrote those laws and spent millions making sure no further laws were written.

  2. I especially like it when they decide to reprimand or even fire people for missing hours because they’re sick or the roads are really bad or the transmission fell out of the car on the way in and then claim the employee made the choice of being absent or being late of their own free will.

  3. Does she realize that if she had her own business she might be working 60-70 hours a week? I guess the trade off is she could have her daughter with her some of the time.

  4. Not to mention that every hour of overtime worked on salary results in no significant gains in any personal way. oh, they might make your job in the future a bit easier at points, but otherwise, all that time and effort just feels like it’s been funneled into a black hole.

    As a self-employed business owner, all that time and effort can show direct gains (or at least noticeable reductions in loss), which means that your work feels valuable, and thus you feel that it’s worthwhile (for the most part, there are always times when you feel like nothing you do makes a difference, wherever you work)

    • And there’s the difference. Free overtime worked for someone else doesn’t benefit you. You don’t get paid for it, you don’t even get thanked.

      Working long hours for yourself has direct payoffs for you: job satisfaction, and the sense you are building something that will last, and hopefully money in the long run.

      That’s something I’m working on doing. I put long hours in on school to be a nurse practitioner. I’m not quitting my full time job, and my private practice will be small.

      But it will be MINE and I can do the kind of patient care I want to do.

  5. And if they don’t make that decision “of their own free will” to work free overtime…They’ll demote, or outright fire you for “not meeting goals/expectations””

    So they can’t require it, but they can certainly punish you for NOT doing it. Which, really, if you can take a performance hit for it, how is that NOT requiring it?

    • SALARIED WORKERS HAVE TO COMPLETE THE FEDERAL “TEST TO QUALIFY AS AN EXECUTIVE” IN ORDER TO BE ‘SALARIED’. SALARIED WORKERS USUALLY ENJOY BENEFITS THAT NON-SALARIED WORKERS DO NOT. ONE DRAW BACK TO BEING A SALARIED WORKER IS THAT YOU AGREE TO WORK ANY AND ALL HOURS NEEDED TO GET THE JOB DONE. THIS YOU AGREE TO VOLUNTARILY AND IS THE REASON FOR, AND THE RESULTS OF, THE “TEST”. THUS, HAVING TO WORK EXTRA HOURS AT SOME POINT THEREAFTER SHOULD NOT COME AS A SURPRISE.

      • Psst, check your caps lock key.

        I would like to point out that Marla said that isn’t LEGAL to REQUIRE them to work 50 hours a week. Whether or not that applies to 45, 43, or what we don’t know. And you are correct regarding the FEDERAL laws for our world. However, STATE laws might also be in place. I know I heard once that somewhere had decided that the salary pay per week was on the ASSUMPTION of a 40 hour week average. Whether that was something that was trying to be put in place, or not I don’t recall. I think it’s a valid assumption and the fact that that wording wasn’t used in the laws is why so many places get away with abusing their salaried managers by having them work 50, 60, 70, or 80 hour weeks with no overtime pay.

    • Umm what? Marla’s husband is on record as being 100% behind her if she chooses to start her own business, I think this would also extend to her finding a different place to work (though that kind of lateral move just means same dung different pile). If I recall he also still has a paying job in the evenings. How is he MAKING her work for Stuart? And if Stuart wants more hours out of Marla, why should that time be free?

    • Wow, lots of compassion there, Eric. And as stated above, demonstration of a lack of uderstanding of Marla’s,family dynamic. Never mind the callousness of thinking that Marla should be punished for Grumbel’s poor payroll decisions.

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